Sessions

Sunday, October 27

10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

CE01 – Equity and Inclusion Drive Design Excellence
Date: Sunday, October 27
Time: 10:30 AM to 12:00 PM
Presenters:
Jennifer Marshall, Architect AIBC, FRAIC
Susan Gushe, FRAIC, Architect AIBC, AAA, SAA, MAA, LEED AP BD+C
Melissa Higgs, Architect AIBC, FRAIC

This session will explore equity and inclusion across practice, in the design process, and in the places we create to bring about excellence in the built environment. The following questions will be explored through presentation, group exercise, and discussion. Practice: How can a more inclusive work environment lead to greater success? Process: How can a more inclusive design process result in more responsive environments? Place: What does inclusive space look like and how do we get there?
10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

CE02 – Comprehensive Density: Driving the Future of Community and Campus Recreation Hubs
Date: Sunday, October 27
Time: 10:30 AM to 12:00 PM
Presenter:
Ted Watson, OAA, Architect AIBC, AAA, NSAA, SAA Int’l., Assoc. AIA, MRAIC, SCUP, LEED AP

Comprehensive Density refers to facilities that combine wellness components into dense, overlapping, and often vertically arranged planning forms with the intent of maximizing value and the user experience, now and into the future. Learn about the recent history and density convergence of community and campus recreation centres. Explore current and future trends through global project examples with a clear and powerful mandate to further maximize density in social, spatial, and programmatic ways that lead to wellness in all its forms.

Monday, October 28

10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

CE03 – Underground expansion below Toronto's Union Station: "Canada's largest heritage railway transportation hub"
Date: Monday, October 28
Time: 10:30 AM to 12:00 PM
Presenters:
Silvio Baldassarra, FRAIC, OAA, AAA, AANB, MAIBC, MAA
Saffarini Hassan, P.Eng, PMP and LEEP AP

Built in the Beaux-Arts style, Toronto Union Station opened in 1927. In 1995, Union Station was designated a National Historic Site, and in 2000, it was purchased by the City of Toronto.

The City of Toronto engaged NORR Architects & Engineers in 2007 to set a new vision for Union Station, including:

1. Expansion and enhancement of the largest transportation processor in Canada, with 65 million passengers per year, expected to grow to 130 million by 2031.
2. Restoration and renovation of this National Historic Site, the most important Beaux- Arts railway station in Canada.
3. Creation of a destination commercial retail hub, based on similar hubs such as Grand Central Station in New York.

NORR’s “dig down” solution provided the needed transportation capacity and added 114,000 square feet through an innovative below-grade structural solution, without in any way affecting the heritage value of Union Station.

See also: T12 - Union Station Revitalization Project
1:30 PM - 3:00 PM

CE04 – An Architectural Conversation of Old and New: Queen Richmond Centre West
Date: Monday, October 28
Time: 1:30 PM to 3:00 PM
Presenters:
Peter Kurkjian, OAA, LEED AP
Carlos de Oliveira, MASc, PEng.
Dermot Sweeny, OAA AIBC MRAIC

Queen Richmond Centre West is a bold example of the architectural conversation between old and new, propelling Toronto into the future while staying connected to its history. The talk will describe various aspects of 134 Peter Street, including:
- the ingenuity required to preserve its industrial heritage while creating a space that is an active extension into the public realm;
- the challenges to finding a structural and architectural solution for a new 11-storey office building above the epochal "delta frames," complete with steel castings; and
- the sustainable features of the building that have made this a LEED® Gold certified project.

See also: T07 - Queen Richmond Centre West by Sweeny&Co Architects

Tuesday, October 29

10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

CE05 – Integrated Hybrid Systems: A Case Study of Low Energy Building Design
Date: Tuesday, October 29
Time: 10:30 AM to 12:00 PM
Presenters:
Barry Sampson, OAA FRAIC AIA
Erik Olsen, PE
Jesse Dormody, OAA MRAIC

Baird Sampson Neuert architects and Transsolar KlimaEngineering will present a case study of the Rob and Cheryl McEwen Graduate Study and Research Building at York University. With a building-wide natural ventilation system driven by one of the largest solar chimneys in Canada, the project integrates climate-responsive passive and low-energy active systems in a highly efficient ‘hybrid’ approach.  The facility operates with very low energy use intensity, has significantly reduced carbon emissions, and provides a healthy and comfortable interior environment for occupants.

See also: T14 - Rob and Cheryl McEwen Graduate Study and Research Building, Schulich School of Business, York University
10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

CE06 – The Making of a Library, the Shaping of a City
Date: Tuesday, October 29
Time: 10:30 AM to 12:00 PM
Presenters:
Rob Adamson, MRAIC
Paul Polson, FRAIC
Kate Thompson, MRAIC

Named one of the World's Most Futuristic Libraries by Architectural Digest, Calgary's New Central Library is revolutionizing modern libraries with its forward-thinking design, quality architecture, and strong sense of placemaking.

As Calgary’s largest public investment since the 1988 Olympics, the library signals the beginning of a new chapter in the life of the city, one centred on the innovation of knowledge and culture. This session will focus on how the design vision for the library unfolded, and on the unique project delivery method, with the client, builder, and architect working as one team.
1:30 PM - 3:30 PM

CE20 – Back to School : “Teaching, Learning and Practicing Architecture”
Date: Tuesday, October 29
Time: 1:30 PM to 3:00 PM

This session is presented by the RAIC Emerging Practitioners.
1:30 PM - 3:00 PM

CE07 – Through Other Eyes: How People with Vision Loss See Your Buildings
Date: Tuesday, October 29
Time: 1:30 PM to 3:00 PM
Presenters:
Bob Topping, OAA, MRAIC, Architect
David Lepofsky, LLB, Lawyer, Professor and Advocate for Persons with Disabilities

The session will explore how persons with vision loss interact with buildings and landscapes. Through case studies and stories of lived experience, the presenters will identify successful design strategies for enhancing the accessibility of the built environment for persons who are blind or have other types of vision loss. Issues to be addressed from the user's perspective include: How do I find the front door? How do I navigate my way to a room or element within a building? How do I use illumination-, textural- and luminance-contrast to assist with wayfinding? What contributes to my enjoyment of buildings and landscapes?
1:30 PM - 3:00 PM

CE08 – Mid-rise and High-Rise Wood Construction: The Evolution of Canadian Regulatory Frameworks and Experience in Québec, Ontario, and BC
Date: Tuesday, October 29
Time: 1:30 PM to 3:00 PM
Presenters:
Amal Tamim, M.Sc. FPE
Marc-André Langevin, Ing.

Architects and designers will be introduced to the Canadian regulatory frameworks related to building codes. Through the example of mid-rise and high-rise wood construction, the session illustrates the different paths available for introducing and adopting innovative construction into the building code for future buildings’ design concepts and materials. The participants will be provided with an overview of the fire and life safety provisions adopted in Québec, Ontario, and BC as applicable to mid-rise and high-rise wood construction. The session presents examples of alternative methods and approval paths available to architects and designers at the local, provincial, and national levels to support their practice.

Wednesday, October 30

10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

CE09 – From Getting Places to Placemaking: Transit in Two Canadian cities
Date: Wednesday, October 30
Time: 10:30 AM to 12:00 PM
Presenters:
Lisa D'Abbondanza, MRAIC, Associate Director Practice Lead, Architecture
Jennifer Ujimoto, Senior Architect, Transit Design

How do architects fit into the equation of delivering great mobility projects that enable livable, prosperous, and resilient cities?  The architects for the Eglinton Crosstown LRT and the Mississauga BRT will discuss their projects in context. They will compare the development of transit in Toronto – an archetypal North American city – to transit development in Mississauga, a suburb of Toronto that is now Canada’s fastest growing community. The team will reflect on the complexity of planning and designing infrastructure, whether solving immediate needs or predicting future demands.
10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

CE10 – Performance-Driven Design: A Future of Energy Models Informing Key Design Decisions
Date: Wednesday, October 30
Time: 10:30 AM to 12:00 PM
Presenters:
Jenny McMinn, MRAIC Managing Director
Craig McIntyre, P.Eng
Jason Manikel

As owner’s requirements and building codes are progressively demanding higher performing buildings, architects will see building design increasingly reliant upon energy modeling results. Most design-stage models are not created with the intention of predicting actual energy use. However, seeing energy conservation design translated into real-world energy savings is imperative to combat climate change.

With unprecedented access to anonymized energy models and metered data for over 100 buildings, this team analyzed how buildings use energy in reality and how this differs from model predictions. Their work aimed to support or demystify conventional wisdom and the design assumptions commonly used in the industry.
10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

CE11 - A Space for Progress: Transforming Your Studio to Meet Industry Realities
Date: Wednesday, October 30
Time: 10:30 AM to 12:00 PM
Presenters:
Ellen Bensky, Partner
Steve Nonis, MRAIC, Partner

Advancement in architecture is radical, rapid, and revolutionary, driving the need to reflect on whether studio spaces reflect current realities. Participants will learn about the need to invest and adapt, fostering a culture of forward-thinking possibilities. Speakers will share the process, requirements, and philosophy of re-imagining space to reflect an unwavering commitment to continual learning, paired with client and staff experience. The aim is to challenge whether studios best serve staff, clients, and the shift resulting from digitization. Of particular focus will be “The Lab,” an area dedicated and conducive to technologically innovative learning.
10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

CE12 - The Next Green – Scandinavian Innovation in Sustainable Design
Date: Wednesday, October 30
Time: 10:30 AM to 12:00 PM
Presenter:
Heather Dubbeldam, FRAIC

Countries and municipalities are setting more aggressive goals for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and energy demands in new buildings in order to mitigate climate change. This represents a prime opportunity for architects to apply their skills and experience to lead the charge. However, sustainable high-performance and low-energy building is often considered solely a technological discipline. In reality, real low energy results are achieved through the design and form of the building, and this can be a generator for design innovation. Dubbeldam Architecture + Design’s Prix de Rome research project, “The Next Green – Innovation in Sustainable Design,” explores how Scandinavian countries lead in innovative sustainable design without compromising design excellence, thereby achieving better environmental and socially sustainable outcomes in their buildings.
1:30 PM - 3:00 PM

CE19 - Indigenous Integration
Date: Wednesday, October 30
Time:  1:30 PM - 3:00 PM
1:30 PM - 3:00 PM

CE13 - The Inuit Qaujimajatuqangit Body of Knowledge Guiding the Design of the Canadian High Arctic Research Station (CHARS)
Date: Wednesday, October 30
Time: 1:30 PM to 3:00 PM
Presenter:
Alain Fournier, Architect, OAQ, OAA, ALBNL, NWTAA, FRAIC

Following a unique request by lkaluktutiak residents (Cambridge Bay), Inuit Qaujimajatuqangit (referred to as IQ, or "what has always been known by the Inuit") was applied to the design of the Canadian High Arctic Research Station (CHARS) in their community. This has been a ground-breaking endeavor for both the Nunavummiut and the architects. The Inuit took on the responsibility, with the architects, of shaping their built environment. Key IQ concepts and values were brought to bear on the design process: environmental stewardship, collaborative relationships, problem-solving resourcefulness, and skills and knowledge acquisition.This holistic approach led to unexpected expressions of identity, buy-in, and pride.
1:30 PM - 3:00 PM

CE14 - Implementing a Digital Practice: Looking Beyond BIM Management
Date: Wednesday, October 30
Time: 1:30 PM to 3:00 PM
Presenters:
Ellen Bensky, Partner
Steve Nonis, MRAIC, Partner

The ever changing landscape that drives the architecture industry calls for new ways of structuring and organizing workforces. Beyond BIM management, learn how a firm leveraged staff, creating a full-time Digital Practice Department to respond to the demands of staying relevant. With a mindset to embrace change, the team was based on distinct pillars: The Practice, Research and Development, Education, and Community Outreach. From these core tenets, the magnitude of what is required to integrate automation and technology emerged. Attendees will hear how this departmental approach creates a stable, dedicated environment that encourages growth.
1:30 PM - 3:00 PM

CE15 - Typology: Multi-unit Residential
Date: Wednesday, October 30
Time: 1:30 PM to 3:00 PM
Presenters:
Sasa Radulovic, FRAIC
Johanna Hurme. FRAIC

In the field of architecture, the multi-family housing typology has the most impact on the lives of “ordinary people” going about their everyday lives. With the condo boom taking hold across the country, the number of residential units passing across an architect’s desk is unprecedented. As a result of the typology’s inherent repetition and potentially banal programme – as well as the private sector’s pursuit of profit at the expense of quality and livability – the margin in which architecture can operate is incredibly narrow. It seems important that as architects we respond to the challenges of this typology with the rigour it deserves.
3:30 PM - 5:00 PM

CE16 - Leading the Change towards Ultra-Low Energy and Passive House Buildings
Date: Wednesday, October 30
Time:  3:30 PM to 5:00 PM
Presenter:
Marine Sanchez – Energy Analyst and Passive House Specialist

High-performance, ultra-low energy buildings are coming to national and provincial codes, with Passive House buildings required in Vancouver and Toronto by 2030. Low-energy new-build and retrofits are key to meeting our greenhouse gas emission targets and building climate change resiliency. Canadian practices will become leaders in this effort.

The design process for high performance buildings is fundamentally different and will take some adjustment. Required changes will be explored through case studies of large Passive House buildings (student residences, residential towers). Insights will equip Canadian practices with tools to integrate high performance into their core work and be ready for the future.
3:30 PM - 5:00 PM

CE17 - Building for a Net Zero Carbon Future: A Case Study of Mount Dennis Childcare
Date: Wednesday, October 30
Time:  3:30 PM to 5:00 PM
Presenters:
Sheena Sharp, FRAIC
Susan Lewin, FRAIC
Lisa King, Senior Policy Planner

This seminar will explore a design approach used to achieve Net Zero Carbon Design, using the City of Toronto’s Mount Dennis Childcare Net Zero facility as a case study. The team used Passive House principles, the Toronto Green Standard, and the CaGBC Zero Carbon Building Standard as guides to develop this 19,000 sq. ft. envelope-driven building. The city imposed additional constraints: that it be designed for resiliency and that there be no on-site greenhouse gas emissions. The project uses envelope enhancements, timber structure, geothermal, and Photovoltaic/Thermal (PV/T). It will be the largest child care centre in Toronto's system, supporting the Reggio Emilia philosophy.
3:30 PM - 5:00 PM

CE18 - Designing for Future Mobility: Developing a Framework for the Livable Future City
Date: Wednesday, October 30
Time:  3:30 PM to 5:00 PM
Presenter:
Aaron Knorr, Registered Architect (PA), LEED AP

We are experiencing a technologically-driven shift in urban mobility that is transforming the way we move and live in cities. This presentation and discussion will address the impacts of autonomous, networked, shared, and electrified vehicles on architecture and urban design. Attendees will learn about rapid changes in urban mobility and how to apply a values-based approach that supports sustainable, equitable, and people-first communities. A series of principles and present-day design opportunities, informed by this research, will empower designers to make informed decisions that anticipate future disruptions while shaping a more livable and sustainable future city.